A.A.L. (Against All Logic): “Illusions of Shameless Abundance” E.P.

A creative disruption

Revisiting the moniker A.A.L. (Against All Logic), the New York-based electronic composer Nicolas Jaar dropped a new two-track featuring Lydia Lunch, F.K.A. twigs, and Estado Unido. The standalone E.P. comes as the announcement of the full-length album, “2017-2019,” for next week, on Friday, February 7th.

The American-Chilean producer takes two female voices to collaborate with in the advancement. Both are unique, artistically related to him from the past to the present. Appropriately, in the Lydia Lunch case, it would be better to say the relationship is an emotional link. As the founder and owner of imprint Other People, Jaar released “Teenage Jesus And The Jerks: Live 1977-1979” in November 2015. The album compiled a selection of live tracks recorded through the period by the seminal New York’s No Wave band Lunch formed at the age of 17. It is part of an artist’s commitment to the city, expressed on his critically acclaimed second album, “Sirens” (2016), an overlook to a personal Manhattan where historical resounds, renditions to musical influences, and home recordings come along in a sort of an electronic suite.

Against All Logic: “Illusions of Shameless Abundance” E.P. (Other People, 2020)

Illusions of Shameless Abundance” acts like the A-side of the release. It lives in the tension of repeated phrasing over a percussion sequence, disrupted, and returned continually by fluent producer’s technical skills, where Lydia Lunch‘s monotone voice is chanting and balanced to a spoken word statement.

The revers, B-side, as defined on Nicolas Jaar‘s Facebook, is blurring identities. Credited to F.K.A. twigs‘ contribution, it is supposed as a grateful counterpart to Nicolas Jaar‘s production of her second full-length album, “Magdalena.” It is also a statement, but in this case, based on distortion, a substantial vocal device treatment. Estado Unido -an unknown artist for me until now- opens the chanting of “Alucinao” with the typical syllables’ eating, proper for the idiomatic phonetics of South America, The Caribbean (Cuba), and Andalucía (Spain). It’s hard to get the lyrics at first listening, even for a native Spanish-speaking tongue. Better go to check them out on the correspondent Soundcloud page. The difficulty of understanding also happens with the following F.K.A. twigs‘ part, which is rather than incomprehensible, no easy exercise to attribute it to the vocal identity of the British artist, though recognizable under the layered, at least in a second approach.

The reason why all this misidentification comes from I would dare to say it belongs to how the track appears on the Other People RecordsSoundcloud page, tagged as “grimeton,” a stylish neologism; born as the melting form of “grime” and “reggaeton.” With the natural ability, A.A.L. (Against All Logic) goes imaginative in an impeccable production to an act of creative disruption, overturning the existing conventions. Sharply using the staccato rhythm of the grime pattern, fluently enriched with cowbells and elements of Latin percussion, the composition delivers enough melody to ensure the message is received. Because of “Alucinao” is a statement, an accusation with the shaking appeal of the art. A disrupted reflection to pause the deluge, the increasing flow of marketing that blurs the truth to an unrecognizable point. Nicolas Jaar, or disguised in A.A.L. (Against All Logic), always has the credit of being critically reflexive, and the talent to express his thoughts musically, with the elements of our nowadays’ truth (reality).

Illusions of Shameless Abundance” E.P. is an unbeatable advance to the expected album “2017-2019,” the second round for A.A.L. (Against All Logic) new material compilation after “2012 -2017,” released on February 2018. Last week of January 2020 had a surprising round-up with this news and with the uploading of Against All Logic Mix recorded for NTS.

Against All Logic : “2017-2019” L.P. (Other People, 2020)

When Disco embraced New Wave

A genuine New York City expression

W- 2020/02/01-02

1980/02/01

As “American Gigolo” screened on Friday, February 1st, 1980, a phenomenal smash hit single was on the spread: ‘Call Me.’ The main theme song of Paul Schrader‘s movie soundtrack was a composition by Italian disco producer Giorgio Moroder with Deborah Harris (Blondie) on vocals, who also took the chance for writing the lyrics.
The song had a diversified release in three different record companies, attending length and language used for the singing. The original and most extended version came from the original soundtrack by Polydor. Chrysalis went for the 7″ and 12″ formats. Finally, the Disco label Salsoul Records offered a Spanish version of the song with lyrics written by Buddy and Maru McCluskey.
Blondie‘s front-woman claiming ‘Call Me‘ in Italian, French, and Spanish on the bridge of the original English-language version was an exultant exercise of multilingual sophistication. The song made its way up on the home lists and abroad very rapidly. It reached number one for six consecutive weeks on the Billboard Hot Hundred chart until Lipps. Inc smash hit ‘Funkytown‘ knocked it off. It was time when Disco was rushing to the peak, tagged as commercial, and considered as “what people want to hear.”

Blondie’s ‘Call Me’ single 7″cover (Chrysalis, 1980)

After ‘Heart of Glass,’ track included in the 1978 album “Parallel Lines,” ‘Call Me,’ was the second # 1 hit single for Blondie on the domestic charts. Both runs were in disco flavor and had a growing time-line of controversy to the band. Aroused from the New York explosion of new wave, Debbie Harry and Chris Stein were involved in the alternative move placed south of Washington Square as much as seduced for the funkier sound of the disco beat. Blondie revolted the CBGB‘s audience when decided to include a rendition to Donna Summer‘s ‘I Feel Love‘ at the Blitz Benefit Concert in May 1978. For the first time, the crowd split in two at the famous venue, with a majority wooing how a punk turned a new wave band dared to play a disco number. That was a daring crossing-over, but the spirit of the city had already step further in that direction, liquidizing barriers since 1976.
At the time, these were the main options for the night: Southbound, straight to whitey punk-rock Saturday-night-kicks at CBGB‘s, or Mudd Club. The other one was to turn right from Christopher St. down To Hudson Square. That implied other Lower Manhattan venues, specifically, for black music lovers, way apart from the Bowery: The Larry Levan‘s temple, The Paradise Garage, unfortunately, nicknamed as the “Gay-rage.” Of course, Palladium and the infamous Studio 54, but those were on restricted access. What Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager did with their club was to normalize a living trend for avoiding prejudice, taking all kinds of options from dark no-go places to the lights of Broadway. The proposal of Le Clique, the nightly extravaganza moving from place to place, full of clowns, burlesque artists, punks, strippers, and acrobats going wild, finally took a definitive location. It improved in a Downtown old theater, restyled as a selective venue for a free-minded glamorous jam. They were “la creme” of avant-everything followed by a multitude of wannabes standing at the door.
The song ‘Call Me‘ brought attention from the screen to the streets, wrapped up with images of a mistreated professional until then in movies (a male prostitute involved in a politic thriller). New wavers were to call for Disco’s demise. The music industry believed the phenomenon of Disco ought to turn into Dance, as one of revitalizing ingredients for rock, and tagged it as D.O.R. (Dance Oriented Rock). Ironically, on the same weekend ‘Call Me‘ took off for glory, Studio 54 closed down due to legal problems. In some way, ‘Call Me‘ aired what the rutilant club did for the city’s night-life, a ground-breaking for the indulgent Xing instead of parceling options over the square map. It is from where everything came. A synthetic path followed through the years by bands like Liquid Liquid, LCD Soundsystem Blondie kept it with ‘Rapture,’ adding rap on the bridge. Another genuine N.Y.C. expression.